Summer has come and passed…

…the lazy will never last.

September 19th! That’s the last day when we will accept artwork submissions!

We’re looking for a new default background that will be shipped with Mageia 5. We might also pick one or two runners up that will be bundled as alternative backgrounds. Ideas for screensavers and other artwork that you think we could use will also be appreciated.

Please make sure that you read and understand the rules.
You can submit your artwork to the Flickr page or send it by email to artwork@group.mageia.org.

If you want to win the background contest, here’s a few points to keep in mind:

  • Historically speaking, the images chosen for the default background were simple abstract artworks that used the Mageia color palette.
  • Photos of real life objects/people/plants/animals will not even be considered.
  • Your image must be an original piece, and you must be able to provide source files (xcf or svg). If you can’t comply for a technical reason, please get in touch with us on the Atelier mailing list.
  • Your image must have a sufficient resolution.

My TODO List for LaKademy 2014

logoazul_menor

Next week São Paulo, one of the biggest cities in this planet, will host the second KDE Latin America Summit – or, how we call, LaKademy!

The event will be held in the FLOSS Competence Center of University of São Paulo, an interesting center where academia, enterprises, and community works together to create, to improve, and to research free and open source software.

In this event, Latin America community will try a new thing: we will have presentations about KDE stuffs. In specific KDE events of this part of the world it is more common to have only hacking sessions, and KDE presentations and short courses are given only in more general free software events. This time we organized an “open” event to non-KDE contributors too – maybe in the end of event they will be new gearheads.

The event program have a lot of topics: artwork, porting software from GTK to Qt (potential flamewar detected =D), KDE Connect, and more. I will present an introductory tutorial about C++ + Qt + KDE on Android. The main study case to be presented will be GCompris, and it will be interesting to show a software with a same source code compiling and running on Linux and Android. I will to show another software too: liquidfun, a C++ library to liquid simulation (it have an amazing demo in Android); VoltAir, a QML-based game developed by Google to Android (and open source!); and maybe KAlgebra, but I need to compile it yet.

Yes, it is C++ and QML on Android!

For hacking session I will reserve a time to study the Qt5/KF5 port of Cantor; it is time to begin this work. Other thing in this topic, I would like to talk with my KDE colleagues about a software to help scientific writing… well, wait for it until next year. =) I will work in KDE Brazil bots on social networks to fix some bugs too.

For meetings, I expect to discuss about communications tools (my propose is to use KDE todo to help with promo actions management), and to contribute with evaluation of KDE Brazil actions in the country. Since last LaKademy (2012, Porto Alegre), we continues to spread KDE in free software events, and we can to bring several KDE contributors to Brazil too. Now we must to think in more and news activities to do.

But LaKademy is not only about work. We will have some cultural activities too, for example the Konvescote at Garoa Hacker Club, a hackerspace in São Paulo, and some beers  to drink in Vila Madalena district. More important, I am very happy to see my KDE colleagues again (Brazil, why so big?).

So, let’s to do an amazing LaKademy this year! Look at Planet KDE and Planet KDE Portuguese to see more news directly from the event!

I see you at LaKademy!

(or in Akademy, but it is story to other post :) )

imgoingtoLakademytamanhopequeno

First day at LinuxCon NA 2014

Porec

Interesting to pass from vacation with family in Croatia to France after 10 hours of drive and then the day after being in a plane, flying to Chicago to attend my 3rd LinuxCon, held this time in the mythic Chicago city.

Chicago

While I arrived Monday evening, I had time to catch up some mail, make some conf calls on Tuesday before attending the first part of the event, which was the VIP dinner. An opportunity to talk to HP colleagues I met for the first time physically, even if we already interacted electronically previously.

VIP dinner

A view on the VIP Dinner

Wednesday the 20th was the first day of the event which started as usual with Jim Zemlin’s Keynote. This time he chose to talk about what the Linux Foundation rules disallow: The Linux Foundation itself ! And more largely about the roles of foundations to support open source development, their key cleaning facility role.

Jim Zemlin

Jim had a quite funny slide exaplining how everybody is seeing him, while what he is really doing is cleaning stuff so Linus, Greg and thouands of others could code and manage Linux.

He also announced the new LF certification program (Certified sysadmin and Engineers). While I understand the need of having more recognized Open Source ad Linux Professionals, unlinked to a company (such as the RHCE one) I wonder whether we were needing a new certification wile we do have LPI. I hope the 2 will cooperate to avoid again proliferation. Not that proliferation is bad per se. But why dedicate multiple times efforts to create training supports, manage registrations, … when someone already works on that, maybe in a different way, but maybe patchable to be adopted by the LF. Hopefully this will be solved somehow.

LF certifications

After that we had the also traditional Linux Kernel panel moderated by Greg Kroah-Hartmann with Andy, S, Andrew Morton and Linus Torvalds of course. Nothing really new came out. Anyway, it’s always refreshing to see our heros on stage full of confidence and hope for what they do.

Kernel Round Table

Linus insisted once more on the fact he wants Linux to be more dominant on the desktop market. As a 21 years linux desktop user myself, I can only be in agreement with that. Where is however the docker of the desktop, that will make everybody want to change and move to it ? When people see my Mageia distro they’re always surprised how many stuff you can do out of the box with a Linux Desktop. Phones have helped people go away from the monopoly interface but Macs do not help bringing back people to Linux. If at least all people attending LinuxCon and developing FLOSS would run Linux, that would be great !

Linus Torvalds

Then it was time for elective sessions. I chose first to know more about devstack.
Sean Dague from HP presented OpenStack in 10 Minutes with devstack
devstack pulls everything from git. As it heavily modifies your system so do rather that in a VM/Container. devstack launches tempest (the OpenStack test suite) at the end for the install. Sean insisted on the flow of requests generated inside OpenStack and demonstrated how you can easily modify the devstack environment and re-run it to test easily your modification.

devstack provides an easy way to support modifications through a conf file. Example given if you add
API_RATE_LIMIT=False
you’ll avoid waiting for an answers from the server in case of devstack exceeding the standard rate of queries.
You can also use localrc.conf to pass specific variables up to the right component.

In order to use it, you’d need 4GB RAM (recommended). It can run in a VM (cirros will work nested). Sean warned that it does not reclone git trees by default and clean.sh should put everything back in order (but cleans stuff !)

Sean Dague

Good presentation, easy to follow and having a quick demo part which confirms that devstack is easy to use :-)

Then I attended Joe Brockmeier’s (Red Hat) presentation around Solving the package issue

Joe explained the notion of SW collections (living under /opt). It’s Available for RHEL, CentOS and Fedora. It brings a new scl command. If you type for example
scl enable php54 “app –option”
that app uses now php 5.4 while the rest of the system ignores it.
For that you’ll need new packages: scl-utils and scl-utils-build
There is a tool spec2scl to convert spec files to generate scl compatible packages.
For more info you can look at http://softwarecollections.org

A remark I made to myself and which was later explicitely said during the presentation is that scl is useful for RHEL to provide newer versions of SW onto the enterprise distributions, while it can also help provide older versions of SW into Fedora (which is moving so fast that not all SW can adapt !).
It’s a sort of Debian backports for RHEL.
Joe also presented rpm-ostree (derived from ostree, git-like for system binaries providing an immutable tree). Under development for now, so not completely usable and probably the least interesting solution.
He moved on with docker, but was pretty generic (on purpose) and seeing it as complementary to package management, whether I think docker is another way of deploying software, which is not caring of packages by providing a layered deployment approach. While I have packaged docker for Mageia, I’m not yet familiar eough with it to be sure of that, and I’m currently working on combining it with project-builder.org. So will comment later on on that.

Joe Brockmeier

Then it was time to animate the FLOSS Governance roundtable for which I was attending LinuxCon. I had what I think is probably the best panel to cover the vast topic with Eileen Evans from HP, Tom Callaway from Red Hat, Gary O’Neall from Source Auditor Inc., Bradley Kuhn from Software Freedom Conservancy (and of course 45 minutes wasn’t sufficient to talk about all the subjects part of this), but I think the interactions were very interesting and lively and hope the audience enjoyed them and learned new aspects of this capital topic for our ecosystem. Of course we talked about licenses, SPDX and its future new 2.0 version, but also of foundations (echoing Jim Zemlin’s keynote), contribution agreements or tax usage (Thanks Bradley !).

FLOSS Governance Roundtable

And this is just the first of a series of such round tables I’ll lead in future events, but more on that later on.

After that, I discussed with Bradley Kuhn and Jilayne Lovejoy about licenses, AGPL, and various related topics, and their feedback were as usual very rich.

Was then time to go back to the latest keynote sessions. The first one I followed was from a new company (for me) CEO, Jay Rogers from Local Motors who tries to make open hardware in the automotive sector.Worth looking at and following whether they will be successful.

Jay Rogers

Then, our own Eileen Evans was on stage to explain her view on the new FLOSS Professional. And I think at her place I’d have been even more impressed as she had a full room so probably some pressure to talk to all these devs and devops. And I think her voice showed that at the begining. But when she entered in the details of the presentation, she did as usual a great job and was particularly convincing. She showed how the FLOSS professional was more than others issued from diverse backgrounds, as she illustrated with her own one. She also showed the variety of activities that each of these people have to cope with everyday, again with an illustration of one of her day of work passing from a contract management or OSRB meeting to an OpenStack foundation board conf call.

Eileen Evans keynote

And that approach of the new FLOSS professional was a convincing echo to Jim Zemlin’s call for more professionals and the focus on people that many speakers have underlined. The FLOSS ecosystem indeed needs so many various competencies in addition to developers and FLOSS is so ubiquituous that the lack of resources is delaying some projects. And Eileen explained why this notion of FLOSS Professional is arising now. Which is in short because FLOSS usage has moved from hobbist developing for themselves to professional developing during work hours. And she also covered the impact on companies where the work in network/communities, between peers is the rule compared to the siloed classical approach. And so companies need people understanding this way of working to evolve.

Eileen Evans

It was then time to catch a bus and enjoy discussing with peers at the Museum of Science and Industry during the evening event where we could also explore the museum.

Museum of Science and Industry of Chicago


Filed under: Event, FLOSS Tagged: Event, Gouvernance, HP, HPLinux, Linux, LinuxCon, Mageia, Open Source, project-builder.org

We Need You! (to try and break stuff)

Guys, this one is coming from the heart.

We keep talking about how Mageia is this and Mageia needs that and Mageia did this totally awesome thing. But you know what? That’s a little bit misleading. See, Mageia isn’t some huge corporation, or even a small business. Mageia is an organization of people. People like you. And right now, we need people like you.

Anybody who has ever tried to get a job in the high tech industry knows that the vast majority of starter positions is in QA (that’s Quality Assurance, something we ALL need). That’s because that area needs the largest workforce. After all, it takes just a few brilliant minds to come up with excellent algorithms, a few more people to actually write the code, and vast legions of people who need to try every possible way to make it not work the way it is supposed to. Because somewhere, someone will find that one weird thing you can do that will crash the whole thing. And before we ship anything, be it a new operating system or just the smallest security update, we need assurances that it stands up to our high demand for quality.

And that’s where you come in.

Today, our QA team is very small. How small is it? It’s so small that right now there really is only one hardened QA expert. To begin with there were two, but one has been forced to cut back a lot of the work due to health issues. We hope that he gets well soon. Now most of the work falls on our only other QA expert. She’s doing her best to give the quality assurances we need while trying to train the small handful of volunteers. Don’t make any mistake, those “untrained professionals” are doing great work as well. In fact, they do an incredible amount of work of really top notch quality despite being rather new to QA, and they’re swamped too. We need more people like them.

Every time a new update comes out it needs to be tested on both supported releases (currently Mageia 3 and Mageia 4) for both architectures (32 and 64 bit). That means that every little security update or new feature needs to be tested 4 times before we can ship it to you, and most of that work is being done by just one person.

We need more people and you can help.
It’s really easy. With a little bit of training and some hands on experience you too can become a great QA tester.

Just head over to the QA portal and find out how you can help.

Mageia is people, and right now we need some help.

No vacation for the brave: Mageia 5 alpha 2 is out!

While many of us are having some well-deserved rest, the Mageia team is still on the deck and working on Mageia 5 development.

This second development release is a big step towards Mageia 5, since most of the core packages have now been updated to their latest stable branches: kernel 3.15.6, X.Org 1.16 and Mesa 10.2.5 for some of the biggest ones. There has also been some important work done towards packaging KDE frameworks 5 (technological foundation for KDE Plasma 5 and KDE Applications 5) and LxQt for Mageia 5: feel free to try them out, and don’t hesitate to report bugs or discuss them on our dev mailing list.

Special thanks to Thomas (aka tmb) who took the time to prepare Live ISOs for this alpha even though he’s taking some time off to regain his health.

You can have a look at  for more details about alpha 2:

Work is in progress. Stay tuned!

Some work on sddm

Sddm in cauldron is now updated to the last release ( 0.0.9 ) and it is now working. Some work have been done for in the pam config file.

If you want to test it in mageia you will need to do :

systemctl disable prefdm.service && systemctl enable sddm.service

On next reboot it will not use prefdm anymore but sddm will start.

If you notice any probleme, please report your bug into Mageia Bugzilla.

Linus, his home and GNOME

Linus Torvalds GNOME3

GUADEC 2014

Some quick thoughts about GUADEC 2014 in no particular order (apologies for any weird English: written while a bit tired):

  • Late opening of registration page made me feel uneasy with arranging things. Sort of felt like things might be cancelled. Probably should’ve spoken up about it beforehand.
  • Strassbourg looks really amazing.
  • I don’t get why EU moves between two cities. Waste of money.
  • I feel for the stress that the organizers must’ve had with GUADEC 2014. Don’t take anything I say about GUADEC 2014 personal.
  • GUADEC 2015 will be in Gothenburg, Sweden. I’m wondering how much alcohol people can legally take and if the selling of alcohol is a good method to ensure it isn’t too expensive for people.
  • I love taking a train, don’t like flights. On the way to Strassbourg I was investigated by a female customs officer. I think she didn’t appreciate me giving her a “wtf” look due to the full body armour + gun she was wearing. IMO that’s too much. Next connection a drunk dude was bothering everyone. It was funny to see what tactics people took. Usually putting their stuff on the empty seats. Initially I thought everyone was being a bit rude (putting your bags on seats on a pretty crowded train is IMO impolite). Initially it was funny when the drunk beggar started to talk to me. Unfortunately quickly discovered he had a really foul smell. He left quickly though, think just wants attention. On the way back the train was delayed quite heavily. First train was annoying, only had to take it for maybe ~30min, was at least delayed by ~20-30min. Reducing my connection time from 38min to IIRC ~8min and making me a bit anxious if I’d miss my connection. Then high speed train eventually was stuck as well, making the German passenger next to me pretty angry. He started talking in English, but really couldn’t be bothered by the delays. Nor by people sitting next to me (upon boarding I took the seat where someone placed a bag, I understand leaving your bags on a seat when train is empty, but afterwards you should be considerate IMO). Trains are entertaining. Regarding flights: read Schneier on Security, I don’t like the senseless rules that are only there to make someone feel good.
  • Though Strassbourg was great, not too many going out places. I wanted to dance, but wasn’t too much around.
  • Surprising amount of non-Europeans/non-USA people attending GUADEC.
  • Realized that I’m an old fart @ release team.
  • Someone was surprised everyone @ GNOME is so young. My first GUADEC is Stuttgart, 2005.
  • 200gr of cheap Supermarket chocolate for max 0.70 EUR. I bought loads of them :-D, though was limited by available space in backpack. Going to have a painful stomach for a couple of days.
  • Usual stuff about being really bad at linking names with faces, not recognizing people I met before. Not being able to connect people I emailed with with the names, etc. Forgetting the names of really cool people. All of this is very frustrating :-(
  • As expected, didn’t attend too many talks.
  • BoFs felt really useful. Didn’t always do whatever that the BoF was about
  • I prefer my company laptop over all the laptops that I saw :-P
  • Apologies that I used the opensuse usb stick to boot Mageia, but hey, it didn’t have an opensuse live image, so…
  • Not too many attendees IMO, wondering why. Late registration? Lack of Nokia? Less travel sponsorship? Thought maybe that we lack community members, but actually there is a impressive amount of “young blood” :-P.
  • Discovered I overlooked the Foundationship renewal email. It was unread in my inbox :-(
  • Didn’t like certain things @ AGM.
  • Couldn’t attend engagement BoF. Never time for the Engagement meetings/hackfests/etc. Still sort of feel like I’m part of it. It would be nice to share thoughts.
  • Met Andrea! Italian and tall.
  • Broke the glass in front of camera. Ordered a replacement, should be easy to fix. Wanted to share everything on Hangouts, now was unable :-(
  • Want to go to Prague :-D
  • Disappointingly easy to find a restaurant with a big group. I thought that it is a given that’ll always take ages to decide.

Pre commit hook for PO files on git.gnome.org

After a little pestering by André I’ve made the following changes regarding PO file checking on git.gnome.org:

  1. PO files are actually checked using msgfmt
  2. Added a simple check to ensure keyword header in .desktop is properly translated

That PO files weren’t checked for syntax issues was pretty surprising for me, it seems no translator ever uploaded a PO file with a wrong syntax, else I assume the sysadmin team would’ve received a bugreport/ticket.

The check for a properly translated keyword header is implemented using sed:

sed -rn '/^#: [^\n]+\.desktop/{:start /\nmsgstr/!{N;b start};/\nmsgid [^\n]+;"/{/\nmsgstr [^\n]+;"/!p}}'

Or in English: match from /^#: .*\.desktop/ until /\nmsgstr/. Then if there is a msgid ending with ";, check if there also is a msgstr ending with ;". If msgstr doesn’t end with ;" but all other conditions apply: print the buffer (so #: line up to msgstr). The git hook itself just looks if the output is empty or not.

Example of the error message.

$ git push
Counting objects: 23, done.
Delta compression using up to 2 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (3/3), done.
Writing objects: 100% (3/3), 313 bytes | 0 bytes/s, done.
Total 3 (delta 2), reused 0 (delta 0)
remote: ---
remote: The following translation (.po) file should ensure the translated content ends with a semicolon. (When updating branch 'master'.)
remote:
remote: po/sl.po
remote:
remote: The following part of the file fails to do this. Please correct the translation and try to push again.
remote:
remote: #: ../data/nautilus.desktop.in.in.h:3
remote: msgid "folder;manager;explore;disk;filesystem;"
remote: msgstr "mapa;upravljalnik;datoteke;raziskovalec;datotečni sistem;disk"
remote:
remote: After making fixes, modify your commit to include them, by doing:
remote:
remote: git add sl.po
remote: git commit --amend
remote:
remote: If you have any further problems or questions, please contact the GNOME Translation Project mailing list <gnome-i18n@gnome.org>. Thank you.
remote: ---
To ssh://git.gnome.org/git/nautilus
 ! [remote rejected] master -> master (pre-receive hook declined)
error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://git.gnome.org/git/nautilus'

Note: explanation can probably be improved. The check is not just for Keywords, also for other things like e.g. mime types, etc.

Some news about KF5

Things moved recently about kf5 in mageia. We had, since a long time, the framework part.

Now that the first stable release is out we packaged the desktop/workspace  release based on KF5.

Unfortunalty this can’t be co-installed in parallel of KDE4. For the moment ( not yet clean packages ) you have to follow those steps:

1- Remove  kdebase4-workspace ( this will remove a bunch of packages workspace dependant ( plasma applets, etc).
2- install plasma-desktop and plasma-workspace

3 restart your session and in your favorite DM go in KF5.

Keep in mind that those are experimental packages.

To report « packaging » bugs, please go to the Mageia Bugzilla

To report funcionnal bugs, please go to KDE Bugzilla